Distant Dusty Universe

Date: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Irene Shivaei
Affiliation: 
University of Arizona
Location: 
Online
Event Type: 
Colloquium

Dust is one of the most mysterious components of galaxies. It not only plays an important role in the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium, but also shapes our views of galaxies by absorbing and scattering UV and optical light and re-emitting it at longer infrared wavelengths. Despite its importance, we know very little about dust at high redshifts. In this talk, I will highlight our recent results on dust and obscured star formation in typical galaxies at redshift of z~2, the peak of cosmic star formation, using our powerful observatories, such as Hubble, Keck, Spitzer, and ALMA. The synergies among these powerful facilities will give us a complete picture of the dust content of galaxies during the peak epoch of star formation activity in the universe.
Moreover, as a member of the JWST/MIRI US GTO science team, I will briefly talk about our HUDF extragalactic survey to probe star formation and AGN activity at z~1-3. JWST/MIRI will be revolutionary in advancing our knowledge about the dust-obscured star formation in high-redshift galaxies, owing to its significantly higher sensitivity and resolution compared to those of its predecessors.

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