Events

E.g., 12/08/2019
E.g., 12/08/2019

Opening a New Window on Our Origins with SOFIA-HIRMES

Date: 
Wednesday, December 11, 2019 - 9:00am PST
Speaker: 
Klaus Pontoppidan
Affiliation: 
STscI
Location: 
N/A
Event Type: 
Teletalk

The origins of the elemental carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen that form life can be traced back to a massive reservoir of prestellar ices, which accretes onto planet-forming disks before they take part in the formation of planetesimals and ultimately planetary atmospheres. Their chemical evolution determines the compositions of planets, including those destined to orbit in a habitable zone. HIRMES, the next generation instrument on SOFIA is expected to make fundamental new contributions to our understanding of planet formation and to the origins of water.

Polarization and Protostars: Uncovering the Role of Magnetic Fields in Star Formation

Date: 
Wednesday, December 11, 2019 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Sarah Sadavoy
Affiliation: 
Queen's University
Location: 
N232 R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

The field of star formation is rapidly changing with the development of high resolution and multi-wavelength instrumentation that observe dust polarization at far-infrared and (sub)millimeter wavelengths.  With these facilities, we are now able to probe dust polarization in protostellar environments on scales of 10-5000 au, revealing the role of magnetic fields in their formation and evolution.

Deconstructing infrared emission in Active Galaxies using FORCAST and HAWC+

Date: 
Thursday, December 12, 2019 - 3:00pm PST
Speaker: 
Lindsay Fuller
Affiliation: 
UTSA
Location: 
N232 R227
Event Type: 
Seminar

Dust and gas play key roles in obscuration and supplying the supermassive black holes (SMBH) in active galactic nuclei (AGN).  Nuclear observations of AGN have historically attributed mid-IR emission primarily to an obscuring parsec-scale dust torus coplanar to the equatorial accretion disk.  However, recent studies have found that a majority (>50%) of nuclear MIR emission is due to an extended radiation-driven dusty wind in the polar region of some nuclei, possibly extending out to hundred-parsec scales.  An additional source of MIR emission on this scale is due to star formation.  With

The Milky Way Laboratory

Date: 
Wednesday, December 18, 2019 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Cara Battersby
Affiliation: 
University of Connecticut
Location: 
N232 R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

Our own Milky Way Galaxy is a powerful and relatively nearby laboratory in which to study the physical processes that occur throughout the Universe. From the organization of gas on galactic scales to the life cycle of gas and stars under varied environmental conditions, studies of our Milky Way underpin many areas of modern astrophysics.

date tbc

Date: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Alyssa Goodman
Affiliation: 
CfA- Harvard
Location: 
N232 R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

TBD

Title - tbd

Date: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 3:30pm PDT
Speaker: 
Loren Anderson
Affiliation: 
West Virginia University
Location: 
R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

tbd

Title - tbd

Date: 
Wednesday, May 06, 2020 - 3:30pm PDT
Speaker: 
Molly Peeples
Affiliation: 
Space Telescope Science Institute
Location: 
N232 R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

tbd