Announcements

Cycle 9 Calls for Proposals Formal Update on July 24

A formal update to the Cycle 9 Calls for Proposals was released on July 24, 2020.

SOFIA’s Deployment to New Zealand Cancelled, New Flights to Resume

The leadership of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy reached a decision that the observatory’s annual deployment to Christchurch, New Zealand, is not feasible this year, given ongoing concerns related to the COVID-19 pandemic. A revised flight schedule is being coordinated to focus on high-priority celestial targets that can be studied from SOFIA’s base at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California.

New Science Mission Operations Director

The Universities Space Research Association (USRA) appointed Dr. Margaret Meixner as the Director of SOFIA’s Science Mission Operations, effective April 13, 2020. As director, Meixner will provide scientific, technical and management guidance to SOFIA. She will work in partnership with the German SOFIA Institute (DSI), and in close collaboration with NASA, to maximize the scientific productivity and impact of the observatory.

New Science Mission Operations Director Dr. Margaret Meixner

Prior to joining USRA, Meixner held several leadership positions at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), including Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope and Instruments Division Deputy. Since 2016, she has been Community Co-Chair of the Origins Space Telescope Science and Technology Definition Team. She is also a Principal Research Scientist at Johns Hopkins University, and a member of NASA’s Astrophysics Advisory Committee.

A recipient of several awards and honors, Meixner was named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2015 and recognized for her leadership in infrared instrumentation for astronomy.  She was also awarded the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) Science Achievement Award in 2009, and the 1994 Annie Jump Cannon Special Commendation of Honor.

Meixner earned her B.S. degrees in electrical engineering and mathematics in 1987 from the University of Maryland, College Park, and received her master and doctorate degrees in astronomy from the University of California, Berkeley.

Flash Funding Call for Betelgeuse Archival Research

With the unprecedented visual light dimming of Betelgeuse seen in the fall of 2019, going into the new year 2020, many scientific questions arose as to the nature of this event and its characteristics at other wavelengths. Under several DDT programs, SOFIA has recently observed Betelgeuse as follows:

  • EXES: Observed about 50 min total, centered on the [Fe II] line 25.9884 microns and [S I] at 25.2516 microns, also including water features at 25.32 microns (note that comparable data obtained in 2015 and 2017 is also available in the archive). Proposal ID: 75_0051
  •  FIFI-LS: Observed about 45 min covering [O I] 63 microns, [O I] 145 microns, [C II] 157microns and a number of CO lines. Proposal ID: 75_0052
  • GREAT: Observed about 1 hour covering the [OI] 63 microns and [C II] 157 microns lines. Proposal ID: 75_0050

These data will have no exclusive use period and are publicly available through the IRSA archive once the pipeline processing and quality control is complete.

This Archival Research Flash Call invites proposals for funding to support the analysis and facilitate timely publication of one or more of these data sets. As a funding call, this Flash Call is open to qualified astronomers with US affiliations, although access to the SOFIA archive is freely available and not limited to those eligible to apply for this funding. The SOFIA program expects that a total budget of up to approximately $100k will be available for this call. Note that larger funding requests for research on SOFIA archival public data can be submitted through the Astrophysics Data Analysis (ADAP) NASA program.

Each proposal shall be be prepared and submitted as a single .pdf file in an e-mail attachment to flash_call@sofia.usra.edubefore April 24, 2020 - 6 pm PDT. A proposal template and a a budget template are available.

More detailed information about the scope of the proposal and proposal guidance can be found in the Betelgeuse Data Archival Research Call For Proposals. For further questions or help in preparing proposals, please contact the SOFIA Help desk at sofia_help@sofia.usra.edu.

Cycle 8 Selection Results Released

View the Cycle 8 Selection Results here.
Read the e-Newsletter here. Subscribe to the e-Newsletter here.

The Cycle 8 Call for Proposals had an outstanding response. For the U.S. and German queue combined, the SOFIA Science Center received 238 observing proposals. Of these, 47 proposals were accepted as Legacy, Priority 1, and Priority 2, with an additional 44 proposals accepted as Priority 3 and Survey programs (see entire list here). Furthermore, five archival research proposals were received and one was accepted.

The selected Legacy program (PI Neufeld) will span two observing cycles; two additional Legacy proposals were selected as pilot programs for Cycle 8 (PIs Lopez Rodriguez and Stephens). The data will have no exclusive-use period, and hence the community will have immediate access to these high-impact datasets.

Legacy Program - HyGAL: Characterizing the Galactic Interstellar Medium with Hydrides
PI: David Neufeld (Johns Hopkins University) and Peter Schilke (University of Cologne)
Proposal ID 08_0038

Abstract Excerpt: By means of absorption-line spectroscopy towards 22 background Terahertz continuum sources widely distributed within the Galactic plane, we will obtain robust measurements of the column densities of six hydride molecules (OH+, H2O+, ArH+, SH, OH, and CH) and two key atomic constituents (C+ and O) within the diffuse ISM. These observations will allow us to address several related questions: (1) What is the distribution function of H2 fraction in the ISM? (2) How does the density of low-energy cosmic-rays vary within the Galaxy? (3) What is the nature of interstellar turbulence (e.g. typical shear or shock velocities), and what mechanisms lead to its dissipation?

The anticipated results are (1) a determination of the distribution function for the H2 fraction in the Galaxy, and how it varies; (2) a determination of the cosmic-ray ionization rate and how it varies; (3) an improved characterization of turbulence in the diffuse ISM, and its dissipation; (4) the provision of enhanced data products that will serve as a legacy for future ISM studies.

Pilot Legacy Program - FIELDMAPS: Filaments Extremely Long and Dark: A Magnetic Polarization Survey
PI: Ian Stephens (Harvard & Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Proposal ID 08_0186

Abstract Excerpt: Molecular gas in a galaxy generally follows the spiral arms. In the Milky Way, the densest of this molecular gas can form long, velocity-coherent filaments parallel and in close proximity to the Galactic plane. These dense filaments make up the 'skeleton' of molecular gas of the Milky Way - akin to the dark dust lanes seen in nearby spiral galaxies - and thus have been called 'bones.' For the early stages of star formation, these bones represent the largest star-forming structures in the Galaxy, and previous studies suggest that magnetic fields are critical to their formation. Our pilot survey of 2 bones show that HAWC+ can detect polarization over large angular extents with modest integration time. To understand how gas collects in the magnetized spiral potential, we propose a legacy survey to probe the magnetic fields across the entire extent of 8 additional bones (for a total of 10). We will use these observations in combination with new magnetohydrodynamical simulations of galactic formation of bones to investigate (1) the role of magnetic fields in the formation of bones, (2) how the field varies between arm and inter-arm bones, and (3) whether or not fields bend into filaments to build gas flows to the largest gravitational potential well.

Pilot Legacy Program - SOFIA Heralds a New Era of Measuring the Magnetic Fields of Galaxies
PI: Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez (SOFIA Science Center)
Proposal ID 08_0012

Abstract Excerpt: Our team has made important and unexpected discoveries about the role of the magnetic fields in nearby galaxies. We have found a) that galaxies typically host large-scale and coherent magnetic fields along the spiral arms, b) magnetic field strengths of ~uG with similar contributions from the random and ordered field components, and c) magnetic fields oriented along galactic outflows that are likely responsible for magnetizing the IGM. To date, these results have mostly emerged from single wavelength regimes: radio synchrotron polarization tracing the large-scale field structure in the ionized gas, and optical studies to investigate the effect of scattering and/or extinction by the ISM. These studies access the field on vastly different spatial scales and within different ISM phases. However, the effect of magnetic fields in dense regions of the ISM, outflows, and the ISM of merging galaxies are still poorly described. SOFIA/HAWC+ is key to provide a complete picture using far-infrared (FIR) polarimetric observations. This Joint Legacy Program aims to construct a comprehensive empirical picture of the magnetic field strength and structure in multiphase ISM of galaxies. Using HAWC+, we will conduct a FIR polarimetric survey covering the full disk of nearby galaxies.

Data Released for First Completed Legacy Program

e-Newsletter Release

Data Released for SOFIA's First Completed Legacy Program

SOFIA Galactic Center Legacy Proposal Data Released

Read the e-Newsletter here.
Subscribe to the e-Newsletter here.

[CII] Discovery Linked to Supermassive Black Hole Jet

e-Newsletter Release

Discovery of Excess [CII] Emission Linked to Supermassive Black Hole Jet

Extreme Excess Emission of Ionized Carbon linked to Jet from Supermassive Black Hole

Read the e-Newsletter here.
Subscribe to the e-Newsletter here.

ApJL Focus Issue

ApJL Cover
In June 2019, the Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL) released a Special Issue providing analysis of several SOFIA studies that have yielded exciting results, including among others a new insight on the age of the galactic center HII region Srg B1, detailed imaging of the nearby galaxy M 51, and an upper limit to the total amount of water emitted from the recently discovered water plumes on Jupter’s moon Europa. The Special Issue can be downloaed here. Topics include the following:
 
  • The Highly Polarized Dusty Emission Core of Cygnus A
  • High Spectral Resolution Observations toward Orion BN at 6 μm: No Evidence for Hot Water
  • The Close AGN Reference Survey (CARS): SOFIA Detects Spatially Resolved [C ii] Emission in the Luminous AGN HE 0433-1028
  • Gemini, SOFIA, and ATCA Reveal Very Young, Massive Protostars in the Collapsing Molecular Cloud BYF 73
  • SOFIA FIFI-LS Observations of Sgr B1: Ionization Structure and Sources of Excitation
  • Infrared Detection of Abundant CS in the Hot Core AFGL 2591 at High Spectral Resolution with SOFIA/EXES
  • High-resolution SOFIA/EXES Spectroscopy of SO2 Gas in the Massive Young Stellar Object MonR2 IRS3: Implications for the Sulfur Budget
  • A SOFIA Survey of [C ii] in the Galaxy M51. I. [C ii] as a Tracer of Star Formation
  • SOFIA Far-infrared Imaging Polarimetry of M82 and NGC 253: Exploring the Supergalactic Wind
  • A Search for Water Vapor Plumes on Europa using SOFIA

JAI Special Issue

Journal of Astronomical Instrumentation Special Issue featuring SOFIA!

Journal of Astronomical Instrumentation cover
The Journal of Astronomical Instrumentation (JAI) Special Issue featuring SOFIA was released in December 2018. The Special Issue is a compilation of in-depth reports and analysis on the telescope and its instrument suite that are extremely useful for those wanting to learn about the observatory. The Special Issue can be downloaded here. Topics include the following:
  • Overall technical advancements since the observatory reached full operational capacity, and a detailed report on the of the SOFIA instruments.
  • An Overview of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy Since Full Operation Capability
  • SOFIA at Full Operation Capability: Technical Performance
  • The SOFIA Telescope in Full Operation
  • Increasing the SOFIA Secondary Mirror Mechanism’s Fast Steering Capability by Identification of a Structural Resonance and Its Subsequent Elimination Through Mass Re-Distribution
  • Image Size and Control System Developments of the Airborne Telescope SOFIA
  • A Review of Science Ground Operations for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)
  • SOFIA Flight Planning and Execution
  • The SOFIA Focal Plane Imager: A Highly Sensitive and Fast Photometer for the Wavelength Range 0.4 to 1 Micron
  • EXES: The Echelon-cross-echelle Spectrograph for SOFIA
  • FIFI-LS: The Field-Imaging Far-Infrared Line Spectrometer on SOFIA
  • Spectral and Spatial Characterization and Calibration of FIFI-LS — The Field Imaging Spectrometer on SOFIA
  • HAWC++, the Far-Infrared Camera and Polarimeter for SOFIA
  • The upGREAT Dual Frequency Heterodyne Arrays for SOFIA
  • SOFIA-HIRMES: Looking Forward to the HIgh-Resolution Mid-infrarEd Spectrometer